Dragonlance Canticle #25 – Renegade Wizards

A group discussion on the novel Renegade Wizards, featuring Trampas Whiteman (Dragonhelm), Weldon Chen (Granak), Cam Banks, Talinthas, and Tristan Zimmerman (Zarvox). We talk about the plot, the characters, the themes, what this means for magic in Dragonlance, and how you can integrate this into your games.

There’s a brief, spoiler-free summary towards the end.

Please send feedback to RaistlinofSolace@gmail.com

3 comments

    • Bluehorse on June 1, 2010 at 10:45 pm
    • Reply

    GREAT EPISODE! Just finished reading this book myself, and i agree, it is one of the best stories to come out of Dragonlance in YEARS!

    • Niltsiar on June 26, 2010 at 11:58 am
    • Reply

    I was a bit disappointed with this one, I loved the first novel of the Anvil of Time series (The Sellsword) and the second one (The Survivors) kept me reading and reading until I was finished. Renegade Wizards on its turn started very well, but when the main characters were introduced it didn’t work out for me and it took me a while to finish.

    I was very disappointed with the young Par-Salian, I was expecting so much more from him. He appears on RW as an insecure character, his personality is very pale. Having a red, a white and a black robe on a mission together I thought their different values and views were to play a major role in the story, but these differences are only scarcely explored, after a few pages they’re all going along just well and they face few relevant moral dilemmas. Between Ladonna’s personality and the outlines of his mission, Par-Salian appears as a very reluctant leader and a daft charater of some sort.

    The main problem, however, is probably that the book is too much focused on Tythonnia and I wasn’t able to identify with the character at all. She’s questioning herself, her values, her views, her order, her sexuality, her place in the world, but she starts the story as a very insecure person who is just being carried away by the stream of events in her life. When she changes her mind and makes important decisions they are very obvious decisions, there was never a good reason why she should have made things different as there was never a good reason for her to conform to her previous values and views.

    Tythonnia is not like Crysania who had strong beliefs and was growing up, learning, changing as the story goes on. The test turned Tythonnia into an empty vassel and that’s how she starts the story, she couldn’t deduce much from her past experiences and to me she’s too lazy finding out who she is and what she stands for when there is so little to hold her back. As consequence the book was kind of anti-climatic to me, my favorite parts were those about the renegade hunters who are awesome characters, I would like to read more about them.

    • Bluehorse on July 11, 2010 at 12:40 pm
    • Reply

    You do make a lot of very good points. I respectfully disagree with you, and still hold that this is a good book. I think it was the simplicity of the plot that was a welcome relief to me, personally. I do think you assessment of Tythonia is very acurate, and also goes with how she is described in the book by High Mage (I can remember his name off the top of my head at the moment) about how her wound is internal. Perhapse that is the whole point. She has her past as well as her present pulling her in different directions. I believe that with a character such as this, it is simply a matter of what side is being nurtured at what time when the drama happens to make them choose sides. She is one of the few True Nuetral characters I have seen other than Vanderjack in the Sellsword.

    I also have to agree with you that a book about the Renegade Hunters would be excellent! Especially if it elaborated on that very dinamic trio of chatacters, and can we get an eplination on that stupid book?! It has to be the oddest artifact i have ever read about.

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